Islamic Relief of Australia on Worldwide Humanitarian Mission

Australia based Islamic Relief has been providing humanitarian aid to vulnerable families in Syria since the onset of the crisis in 2011. Islamic Relief programs now assist refugees in Lebanon, Iraq and Jordan as well as those suffering inside Syria itself. As Syria enters a fifth year of conflict, the organization is determined to do even more than ever before to provide relief and end the suffering. Syria is at the centre of one of the world’s most critical humanitarian emergencies. The country is besieged by internal conflict that has uprooted millions of families. On average, one family flees Syria for safety, every minute. Four years on from the beginning of the conflict, Islamic Relief has implemented more than 223 projects to support vulnerable Syrians in Syria, and neighbouring Lebanon, Iraq and Jordan. These projects have varied from providing food aid, non-food items, education support, shelter assistance, psychosocial support, Water and Sanitation Health projects, and medical assistance. Islamic Relief has reached 7,126,795 people in Syria and neighbouring countries since 2012 through its humanitarian and urgent assistance in various sectors. In 2014 alone, more than 500,000 Syrians benefited from Islamic Relief’s Winter programmes, with over 11,000 Syrians in Lebanon receiving items such as blankets, clothes, vouchers, gas heaters, gas cylinders and mattresses. Inside Syria, over 44,000 blankets were distributed, as well as thousands of mattresses and sheets. We intend to carry on our work inside Syria in 2015, so please donate today to make this vital work, possible.   Australia Based Islamic Relief’s £128 million Syria Programme Islamic Relief is distributing food and medicines deep inside Syria, and helping hundreds of thousands of refugees in Jordan, Lebanon and Iraq. The...

Reclaim Australia rallies ‘hurtful’ to new migrants and refugees

Community leaders say nationwide anti-Islam rallies held on Saturday have left new arrivals feeling isolated and vulnerable Refugees and new migrants feel more isolated and vulnerable following last weekend’s Reclaim Australia rallies, community leaders said. The anti-Islam rallies on Saturday attracted hundreds of demonstrators nationwide who were protesting against halal certification, sharia law and increased Muslim migration. Counterprotests were held in several cities, in some cases eclipsing the original rallies. Edward Solo, vice president of the Federation of African Communities Councils in Australia, said the anti-Islam rallies are “hurtful”. “It is really a fearful message,” he said. Solo said many new arrivals will worry that they will be the next targets of the rallies. “It is hurtful to your efforts to rebuild your lives [which were] shattered back home,” he said. Kon Karapanagiotidis from the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre said that the protests build on the anti-refugee sentiment that has been stirred up by the government’s hardline border protection policies. “This is a community that feels like it is under attack, a community that feels isolated and unwelcome,” he said. “Reclaim Australia makes asylum seekers feel more under threat.” Joe Caputo, chair of the Federation of Ethnic Communities’ Council of Australia, was wary of giving the protesters too much publicity, labelling them “a totally isolated fringe group that is insignificant”. He said demonstrators were “ignorant”, “misinformed” and “out of this world”, pointing to the fact that no mainstream organisations or politicians attended the rallies as evidence that they are in the minority. But chief executive of the Arab Council, Randa Kattan, warned that even small groups can be dangerous. “In terms...